Tuesday, February 5, 2019

Onomatopoeia Words inspired by Roy Lichtenstein



Pop Art!
In the 1950s and 1960s, young British and American
artists made popular culture their subject matter. 
By incorporating logos, brand names, television and
cartoon characters, and other consumer products 
into their work, these artists tested the boundaries
between art and everyday life. 
Roy Lichtenstein was one of the originators of this 
new pop movement. Fascinated by printed mass 
media—particularly newspaper advertising and 
cartoon or comic book illustration—Lichtenstein
developed a style characterized by bold lines, bright
colors, dot patterns, and sometimes words.

The art of today is all
around us. 
Roy Lichtenstein



"America's Worst Artist Ever??"


What is ONOMATOPOIEA?



"Splat, Giggle, Moo"

Friday, January 18, 2019

Animals inspired by Pete Cromer

Image of Rosella
Third and fourth grade artists were inspired by the colorful collages of Australian artist Peter Cromer. They created their own animal collages using watercolor, colored paper and painted scraps.

The Fauves ~ The Wild Beasts

What does THIS:
Image result for tiger
Have to do with THIS?


Watch these two videos about Les Fauves to find out!




Fauvism Notes

  • Fauvism was a style of painting developed in France at the beginning of the 20th century by Henri Matisse and André Derain.

  • The artists who painted in this style were known as 'Les Fauves'.

  • The title 'Les Fauves' (the wild beasts) came from a sarcastic remark by the art critic Louis Vauxcelles.

  • Les Fauves believed that colour should be used to express the artist's feelings about a subject, rather than simply to describe what it looks like.

Fauvist paintings have two main characteristics: simplified drawing and exaggerated colour.



Click here to read more about Les Fauves

Fifth and sixth grade artists painted true Wild Beasts in the style of the Fauve artists.  They used bold, non-realistic colors, strong brushstrokes and compelling composition.


Kindergarten Rainbow Fish

Kindergarten artists read "Rainbow Fish" by Marcus Pfister, and made their own using crayon and watercolor resist and sequins.
Image result for rainbow fish

Wayne Thiebaud Cakes



When a very special person in our school celebrated a big birthday, it was the perfect time to look at the artwork of Wayne Theibaud and draw some cakes and cupcakes!  We used Kwik Stix tempera paint sticks and Sharpie markers.

Geometric Shape Robots!

Color Wheels

Line Paintings by Grades One and Two

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